ASD or not to ASD???
Updated on April 13, 2014 in Water Restoration
9 on April 4, 2014

How many of you have completed the WRT course but not the ASD class? What is the biggest reason if you have yet to take it? ( cost- locations-dates-etc.)

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0 on April 6, 2014

You gotta take both in my opinion.  The adjuster out there are really starting to look for companies that can dry homes without tearing them up.  ASD is a must in my opinion.  So much so I have been to multiple ASD classes and seem to learn something each time.

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0 on April 8, 2014

Many seem to think WRT is all they need. Maybe it gives them a Certification that they can wave in the right faces.
My opinion. WRT is a good start. Take the principles you learn in this class and get on with the real education……. more advanced classes (ASD) and experience applying these principles in the field….. working in a company that knows and supports them.

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I have a different take on the results derived from the IICRC water courses. This is what I tell students:

  • Those who complete the IICRC WRT courses are qualified to be: nothing more than a “helper” on a water damage loss. They are not qualified to run a water damage team.They only have theory under their belt.
  • Those who complete the WRT and ASD classes are qualified to be: an apprentice water damage technician qualified to lead other helpers on a water damage mitigation effort.
  • Those who complete a WRT and CDS class are qualified to be: supervisors of mitigation teams. The CDS class is much more “white collar” than “blue collar.” It’s for managers – not technicians. Therefore, they might be good for beginner project management.
  • Those who complete WRT, ASD and CDS have studied to be: restoration division managers. They need to have the theory under their belt so that they can relate to the needs of all the materially interested parties.

The WRT and ASD courses are positively elementary in my opinion and should not be viewed as advanced by any stretch of imagination. They are basic fundamentals of understanding for the start of a true restorative drying tradesman.

I would also say that the message some people believe the ASD class teaches is misunderstood. ASD is not an “in-place” drying class. We are supposed to be teaching the floating of carpet in addition to when in place drying is inappropriate. If we do the math – in-place drying is only a viable option on a VERY SMALL percentage of a restorer’s “real jobs.” My casual polls in the classroom show that in place drying is only an option on about 10% – 20% of the water damage jobs a restorer will encounter! (See the In-Place Drying Summary and Conclusion on page 315, 316 of the S500-2006) So, why all this focus on such an insignificant component of the restorer’s daily opportunities?!… I wonder if an increase in drying equipment sales had something to do with the history of this course…?!

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In short, if I had a water loss in my own house… I would viciously protest an in-place drying strategy and wave this study in the face of any contractor and insurance representative in the room. Of course, I would have my environmental consultant at my side during that discussion.

Ken, I whole heartedly agree with that position. It’s also a position I try to take with my clients as well.  

I’m not there to “save” flooring. I’m there to restore the property to a stable and healthy state so that it can be returned to service quickly, all the while being a good steward of someone else’s checkbook. Sometimes flooring can be saved, but I would also argue that more often than not the conditions that warrant it’s removal exist and should be heeded. 

Many insurance claim representatives would rather argue against the efforts you took [and charged for] to have saved the flooring vs. removing the one item that is holding the largest amount of moisture. It’s easier for them justify to their managers replacing something removed vs. having to qualify the type, quantities and length of time equipment was used to save an item that is also everyone’s largest Indoor Environmental Quality [IEQ] liability.   That liability is falling back to the mitigation company, not the insurance company. 

The warmer drying temperature issue in my opinion is a wash. Sure you can dry in cooler temps, but your likely giving up shorter drying times to do so. So being wet longer isn’t the answer either, and doesn’t support the decisions to save or reject the flooring either way in my book. 

As a professional restorer, we’re often faced with having to perform our work with less than ideal conditions, logistics and of course the reasonings of the other interested parties involved. We have to be open to thinking there’s not a one size fits all answer to everything. So flooring can get saved when it’s reasonable to do so. 

on April 13, 2014

Very odd how this discussion board posts the threads in backwards order. Sorry for the confusing flow in this dialogue.

on April 13, 2014

Thanks Mitch.

Of course you can use that summary. If I post it on a public discussion board – it becomes “public information.”

Now to perhaps take this “in-place drying” discussion to the next level…  Have you seen the study on bacterial amplification during an in-place drying technique following the S500-2006 protocol? This was written by Mr Jim Holland.

Holland, J., Banta, J., Passmore, B., Ayers, M., Abbott, S., Cole, E., (2012). Bacterial Amplification and In-Place Carpet Drying: Implications for Category 1 Water Intrusion Restoration. Journal of Environmental Health, Volume 74, No. 9; May 2012.

The short story here is that in-place drying can produce exponential bacterial amplifications that have been generally ignored up until now. I feel the implications of this study should prompt us to take a very hard look at the process generally taught in the ASD classes (and in some WRT classes).  Further, the study demonstrated how the class of water is affected much more by the TEMPERATURE of the surfaces than the time it resided in the structure. This is huge when we are speaking in a classroom setting and describing the influence of time on the category of water. 

In short, if I had a water loss in my own house… I would viciously protest an in-place drying strategy and wave this study in the face of any contractor and insurance representative in the room. Of course, I would have my environmental consultant at my side during that discussion.

Case in point: take a look at these ASD flood houses after about 15 to 20 water intrusions. They are … alive! Especially the ones that have been dried with warmer temperatures. They have been essentially incubators for several months. No wonder they need a complete “refurbishment.”  For those of you who own an ASD flood house, I invite you to bring in a qualified environmental consultant and have them conduct a few tests. I think you will be surprised at what you find growing in the building.

I will not allow that to happen in my family’s home.

on April 13, 2014

Ken,  You have made a very good point here that the CDS (commercial drying specalist) course is a very important part of your education and it should be added to the list of responsible education requirments for the professional restoration contractor. Even if you are a residental contractor by choice the CDS provides valuable learning for all contractors. 

Ken you also hint at someting I make a point to say every day in my ASD courses. Category 1 clean water loss drying in place is a best case scenario and is your least likely call to receive. Even when looking at claim tracking data from Insurance Companies and Xactware reports therfore you must teach more than how to “dry in place” but you need to know how to offer this service so you can actually help the insurance company reduce cost on claims when they do meet this “perfect secnario” and the rest of the class should talk about the most common claims which involve category 2 and 3 water and how to succesfully navigate these types of projects. 

No matter how the class was started (even if it was a effort to sell more equipment to a newly growing segment of the industry) it still is a great course and in my opnion a necessary part of every professionals training, and it is our duty as instructors to make sure we cover all of the points necessary in this class and point the students down the proper education path to meet their career path.  Thank you for the chart above with your approval I would like to start sharing it in my training as well …..  just like I always suggest the required reading which includes your Leadership in Restorative Drying.

Thank you all for your comments,

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Since there’s no requirement for certifications in most States much beyond a contractors license [some do not even require that], most insurance companies are clueless and/or seemingly careless with regards to your certifications. So many companies can get by just fine even without WRT, which sadly is not only a disservice to their client, but also to our industry as a whole.

You should never think that you know enough about anything you do, and since your already invested in WRT there’s no reason not to take ASD. There’s quite a bit more hands on learning in that course that can be put to immediate and beneficial use to yourself and your company.

But don’t rest on ASD alone. It’s just a one of several valuable stepping stones to becoming a competent restorer.

Having credentials earned through ongoing education, and being able to apply those skills in real time will always set you apart from the rest in a positive light.

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I’ll second what Ken Larson said above.

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